America Goes to War (key art)This engrossing series that tells the story of the American people during World War II. Wartime newsreels, propaganda documentaries, movies, music and humor chronicle changes in American ideals, lifestyles and morals during the 1940s and 1950s.

The story of the American people at war began in the highly acclaimed series ‘Between The Wars’, and continues in this series narrated by journalist Eric Sevareid. Shocked into action by the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Americans respond with an exhilarating sense of common purpose and build the most powerful war production machine the world has ever known. Wartime newsreels, propaganda documentaries, movies, music and humor chronicle changes in American ideals, lifestyles and morals, tracking the major movements in the lives of Americans during the 1940s and 1950s

Episode #101: While the Storm Clouds Gather In this episode, America emerges from the hard times of the Depression. Radio provides nightly entertainment as well as news from the foreign war zones in Europe and Asia. Most Americans wish to stay out of the war, but they support the efforts of President Roosevelt, lend-lease, the peacetime draft, and the new defense industry.

Episode #102: Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition In this episode, the attack on Pearl Harbor sends a bolt of energy surging through the country. Within a few short months, the nation is mobilized and transformed. Fifteen million civilians become soldiers, sailors and marines. Production of civilian goods ends, and most factories convert to war work.

Episode #103: Sacrifice and Shortages This episode examines how Americans coped with food and gas rationing and shortages of cigarettes and nylons. There are victory gardens, scrap drives, the black market, and the first national income tax. Celebrities such as Jack Benny and Jimmy Durante help boost civilian morale.

Episode #104: A String of Pearls In this episode, patriotic American women answer the call to duty–in the armed forces and in the factories and shipyards. Despite condescension and prejudice, women win a permanent place in the American military, but they soon discover that the men in charge consider this major change in American life only temporary.

Episode #105: On the Shady Side of the Street In wartime America, large numbers of young people leave their homes for military service or work in war plants, sowing the seeds of a sexual revolution. This episode documents the trend away from traditional moral concerns.

Episode #106: Right in der Fuehrer’s Face In this episode, the American government enlists the skills of Hollywood, Tin Pan Alley, and Madison Avenue to grind out propaganda for domestic consumption. Hitler and his cohorts are depicted as diabolical villains, while racial attacks by the media against Japanese Americans lead to the internment of hundreds of civilians.

Episode #107: Thanks for the Memories This episode shows American show business solidly supporting the war effort. Scenes at the Hollywood Canteen and other service clubs show ordinary American enlisted men honored and revered by stars and the public. The comedy routine “Who’s on First?” reflects the big question in major league baseball as most players have gone to war.

Episode #108: Accentuating the Positive This episode depicts Hollywood stars going overseas to put on shows for troops in the war zones. Legends like Bob Hope and Marlene Dietrich stage elaborate events for servicemen. In similar fashion, Armed Forces Radio carries American swing music, news, and pop culture around the world.

Episode #109: Mood Indigo: Blacks and Whites Wartime newsreels reveal that the World War II American home front is as racially segregated as the U.S. armed forces. Although prejudice, discrimination and race riots plague the home front, black civilians continue to back the war effort, and black servicemen distinguish themselves overseas.

Episode #110: It’s Been A Long, Long Time This episode chronicles the war’s end with the dramatic explosion of two atomic bombs. The massive war industry is shut down, and millions in the armed forces are demobilized. The GI Bill, the baby boom, and a new materialism sweep millions into the mass-produced suburbs. Overseas, the seeds of the Cold War, Korea and Vietnam have been planted.

Details

LENGTH: 10 x 30 Minutes
FORMAT: Series
CAMERA: SD
INTERNATIONAL TRACK: Yes
TEXTLESS: No
CLOSED CAPTIONS: No
ASPECT RATIO: 4:3
PRODUCTION YEAR: 1990
RELEASE YEAR: 2001
SUPPLIER: Quartet International
COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: USA
RIGHTS TERRITORY: USA