Janson Honors Black History Month

by Mike Mcdonnough on February 14, 2012

in Miscellaneous News

Today, Janson Media celebrates Black History Month and its purpose of educating and reminding Americans of the critical contributions African Americans have made in our country’s history. Janson is proud to offer a diverse selection of content that documents some of the most inspirational stories and movements from the African American timeline. Those compelling experiences which were vital to America’s evolution are captured in the following Janson titles.

The Wereth Eleven (1 x 60′) is an ambitious docudrama based on the true story of eleven African-American soldiers who were ruthlessly murdered by the Nazi SS during the Battle of the Bulge. The film weaves exciting visual effects, never before seen archival footage, and compelling interviews to detail one of the least known atrocities committed during World War II.

Proudly We Served (1 x 58′) is the thrilling true story of the USS Mason (DE 529) and its crew, the only African-American sailors to take a U.S. Navy warship into battle during World War II.

Racehoss: The Life of Albert Race Sample (1 x 141′) is the story of a man that emerged from an angry young man with an abusive childhood on a straight path to the penitentiary. Born in 1930 in Texas, Sample was the mixed-race son of Emma (a hard-drinking black prostitute and gambler) and Mr. Albert (a wealthy white cotton broker and one of her tricks).

The Greatest Journey’s on Earth: South Africa (1 x 48′) follows the story of Vuyisilli Mini, a political activist and composer of many South African freedom songs in the moments he was condemned to death. As he sung his way to the gallows with his self penned songs, Mini proved that you can kill a man, but his song lives on.

Whispers of Angels: A Story About the Underground Railroad (1 x 60′) tells the story of three defiant, brave and free abolitionists Thomas Garrett, William Still and Harriet Tubman, whom along with hundreds of lesser known and nameless opponents of slavery, formed a Corridor of Courage stretching from Maryland’s eastern shore through the length of Delaware to Philadelphia and beyond — making the Underground Railroad a real route to freedom for enslaved Americans before the Civil War.